Subscribe

Making The Impossible Possible – by Dean R. DeLisle

Making the Impossible, Possible

 

An Alternative to Goal Planning

 

How about another way to look at what you want to accomplish in 2008?

 

Most goal planning programs suggest you set a probable/predictable goal with interim milestones to keep track of your performance. More aggressive programs suggest a stretch goal, one that will cause you to do better than your ‘predictable self’ in the coming year.

 

How about accomplishing something that you currently think is impossible?

 

I’m not talking about flying off of a building with mechanical wings you built yourself. I’m asking you to look at areas in you life where you’ve become resigned, where a positive outcome seems impossible. The places in your life that you can’t impact no matter what you do about them. This could include your weight/fitness, a relationship with someone in your family, or the job you have. This task is physically possible but you have just made up: “it can’t be done (by me).”

 

First you have to do some research about what is impossible in your life. One place to look is to ask yourself the following questions:

 

  1. “If I had more time, I’d ______?

 

  1. Or, if I could I’d ___________?

 

Finishing those statements gives some substance to items you might want to accomplish but seem impossible because of the current circumstances in your life. The actual activity may not seem impossible but if I asked you about them you’d stammer something like “there’s no way”.

 

An example of what I’m talking about comes from a client I worked with last year. This successful man held a significant leadership position in state government and was looking for his next position when we began to work together. He described many opportunities and most of them sounded very much like what he was currently doing, which wasn’t one of his goals. So I asked him what he really wanted to do, but he couldn’t name it because his judgment said it wasn’t possible.

 

So I asked him to describe an ideal job. One that he didn’t necessarily know if he could get but that he would take in a minute if it was offered. Here’s what he came up with: a job where he worked fairly independently, working four days a week, making double or triple what he had been making. This was a great first step – he became aware of what he really wanted.

 

Within the first six months we worked together he actually found the job, as he described it. The conversations and activities he had to accomplish to fulfill on getting the job were easier than breaking through his resistance to name what it was he wanted.

 

 

Why?  Because he thought it impossible.

 

What do you think is impossible?  Go for that in 2008.

 

You too can make the impossible, possible.

 

About the Author

 

Tom Caprel, Sr., is the founder of Breakthrough Results, and is a master coach in success, both for life and business. (630) 918-0760.

From the Blog: